About SAYSoCC 10

Why SAYSoCC ?

Climate Change has emerged out to be one of the major problems of our generation, and South Asia region, home to a fifth of the world’s population, and 40 percent of its poor, is already severely hit by climate change impacts in different sectors. The region remains highly vulnerable to droughts, floods and other environmental nuisances that not only devastate lives and livelihoods, but also undermine progress on economic growth and poverty alleviation. Every year, some part of the region is usually in the grip of a devastating consequence of climate change.

The recent devastating floods in Northwest Pakistan has made more than16 million people in flood crisis without home, food, drinking water and health care, and this toll has expected to rise further. More than 1600 people are already dead and hundreds of them are missing due to worst floods that Pakistan has seen for 80 years. And these consequences have expected to be much worst even after the floods resettles. Similarly, massive flash flood due to sudden cloud burst on midnight of 5th August in remote region Ladakh in Kashmir has killed dozens of people and hundreds of them are missing. The death tolls has reached at least 140 and more than 500 wounded and more than 500 people are still missing. These types of climate hazards are likely to aggravate further as climate change proceeds.

In amidst of all this, South Asian is either too marginalized as to know how to curb these issues or does not have the necessary capacity to do so. In either case, it is the loss that matters which requires immediate action. Furthermore, on the international scene, during climate negotiations the interests and needs of the developing world are not catered to, which only adds to the problem. Hence, the 2nd South Asian Youth Summit on Climate Change is an initiative that aims to address the issues related to climate change at the regional level, by involving young people in the process.

Building on the success of last year’s Summit in Dulikhel, Nepal, which dealt with topics such as sustainable development in South Asia, regional cooperation and local climate issues, this year’s Summit in Sri Lanka will incorporate the idea of capacity building of the youth and grassroots organizations in South Asia. Furthermore, we will also explore such themes as adaptation in South Asia, regional actions and the role of the youth in climate negotiations, among others. It will be a five-day long Summit, comprising of workshops, lectures, plenary sessions, roundtable discussions, action projects, and cultural events. However, the most important aspect of the Summit will the opportunity it will provide to the participants to forge into relationships that will permit collective and collaborative thinking and action on climate change in South Asia, something that is greatly needed.

Who is driving this?

The South Asian Youth Climate Movement (SAYCM) is a consortium of youth-driven organizations in South Asia working together on climate change and other environmental issues. SAYCM aims to united the efforts of the South Asian youth and youth organizations in tackling the global climate crisis, particularly in South Asia, which is the most pertinent and severe phenomenon of our time. We believe the youth, as the future leaders of the countries can generate awareness and establish consensus on what role South Asia should play in the global debate, and how it should address national and regional issues of climate justice and adaptation.

The founding national networks of SAYCM and organizers of this summit are:

• Afghan Youth for Social Development-AYSC, Afghanistan
• Bhutanese Youth for Climate Action – BYCA, Bhutan
• Indian Youth Climate Network – IYCN, India
• Maldivian youth climate Network-  MYCN, Maldives
• Nepalese Youth for Climate Action – NYCA, Nepal
• Pakistan Youth Climate Network – PYCN, Pakistan
• Sri Lankan Youth Climate Action Network – SLYCAN, Sri Lanka
• Youth in Action on Climate, Bangladesh– YAC, Bangladesh

Vision and objectives

Our vision is of a movement of young people from South Asia contributing all that they can to the collective local and global effort to redress the climate stability.

By supporting and aligning the myriad efforts of young people around the South Asian Region – be it through policy advocacy, action campaigns, clean energy projects, outreach, science, communications, arts and culture, cleaner consumerism or other means – and mobilizing the synergies across them, we will unleash a powerful force acting on a noble cause: an entire generation mobilized for a healthier climate and a more sustainable future.

Objectives
• To form a regional platform for young people to initiate collective actions
• To educate and empower young people to take actions against climate change
• To facilitate exchange of ideas and sharing of techniques and practices on climate change that are carried by youth groups of South Asia.
• To encourage and facilitate youth participation from South Asia in climate negotiations, leading up to COP16/CMP6 in Cancun, Mexico.

Venue and Dates

The Summit will be held at the MIMT (MAS Institute of Management & Technology) Complex in Thulhiriya, Sri Lanka from 14-19th September 2010. The training center has been appreciated to its eco conservation policies and forms and ideal gathering place for youth for their training in combating climate change and awareness creation.

(MIMT Space glances)   download

Facilitation of the Summit

The host organization, Srilankan Youth Climate Action Network (SLYCAN), also founding network of SAYCM will facilitate and manage all the work, before, during and after the Summit. Professionals, experts and officials will be invited to conduct workshops, sessions and plenary, with moderators facilitating the discussions.

The working language for the Summit will be English with interpretation provided where needed. Working documents will be available in English, as well as, regional South Asian languages.

Session of the Summit

1. Knowledge trainings/workshops
Climate change: science and justice training
Politics & the political process
Theories of adaptation

2. Skill specific trainings/workshops*
Lobbying
Project planning workshop
Facilitation workshop
Presentation workshop
How to use the media effectively

3. Field visit:
A field visit will be made to the following places in Sri Lanka that aim at helping the delegates understanding the various impacts of climate change on the given regions and also explore how communities are adapting to it:
Local fishing community
Visit to a renewable energy plant
Visit to the coral reefs
Visit to rainforest

4. Creative Components
Cultural Performances by the participants
Green fashion show
Making short video clips, photo essay
Rallies and awareness campaigns
Blogging

5. Guest Speakers
Prominent guest speakers, who can inspire youths, talk about climate impacts in local and regional communities, adaptation issues etc

Program Schedule  (download)

Expected Outcomes

By supporting and aligning the myriad efforts of young people around the South Asian Region – be it through policy advocacy, action campaigns, clean energy projects, outreach, science, communications, arts and culture, cleaner consumerism or other means – and mobilizing the synergies across them, we will unleash a powerful force acting on a noble cause: an entire generation mobilized for a healthier climate and a more sustainable future. The main theme of the summit is adaptation and the summit agenda will focus on the same.

By the end of the Summit, the participants will be equipped with the inspiration and knowledge required for addressing issues related to climate change in their respective communities. Once they return to their countries, the participants will initiate adaptation projects, do advocacy work in schools, colleges and deprived communities, encourage young people to work for the environment, and take part in the global climate movement

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3 responses to “About SAYSoCC 10

  1. What is the age bracket of applicants that can apply to participate in the youth summit?
    Would the expenses of the summit be paid by SAARC or borne by the participant?

  2. Mohammad Faisal Akber

    Youth are the catalyst for change. So be ready and come to prevent the climate change.

  3. This is a superb post and may be one that can be followed up to see what goes on

    A comrade mailed this link the other day and I am desperately awaiting your next post. Proceed on the remarkable work.

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